Why Your Business Plan Sucks

The biggest mistake I made in my career was not having a bigger think and giant ambitions from the get go. I decided I would cater to a small audience and take better care of them. I became dependent upon that small audience. You don’t want to be the big fish in a small pond—you need to get out there in the ocean. You have to go big from the get go. Have big think, big ideas, big spend, and make big plays. It takes the same energy and effort to go small as it does big, but the difference is going small is a failing formula. Get obsessed with going massive.

All business plans are flawed because the world doesn’t operate how you think it will. Here are the two main reasons I have never made a business plan:

1. Business plans will never encompass the random events you are unable to predict.
2. Business plans are never big enough.

Nothing is going to go as predicted. Mostly business plans are to give others the confidence that you aren’t just making things up as you go along. But I assure you that you will be. Rather than waste time with a business plan, do these three things:

1) Have monster targets that appear unachievable—

Have daily targets just like you have a lifetime target, a monthly target, and an annual target. What do you need to accomplish today? What do you want to do today? Who do you need to contact today? What would make a successful day? Did you wake up on time? Did you go to sleep early? Did you spend time with the family? Did you spend time with the kids? Did you get your workout in? What’s your daily target?

Why would you want to focus on your daily target? Because you want to see what you’re accomplishing. Why? It’s fuel! It makes you feel good about yourself. You need to make big targets to then fuel you further. Big targets are exciting. Big targets gets you thinking big.

2) Get everyone on board—

You have to be obsessed with getting great people. If you have to tell people what to do every day, you have the wrong people. I was talking to a group of sales managers on a Skype call once saying, “Hey guys, if your guys won’t wake up early and go to sleep late, if they won’t do the Periscopes, the Snap Chats, the Tweets, knock doors and bang the phone, if they won’t be obsessed—you aren’t sold on your own business.”

Let your payroll get big and then push on your people to produce as fast as you can. Make sales and revenue priority. It all starts with you—you must be able to sell your idea and vision of where you want the company to be. What I do is show people they need to hustle and demand—you must DEMAND—to be successful. Get them on board or get them out.

3) Become obsessed like a maniac—

I looked up obsessed a while back and it says, “the domination of one’s thoughts or feelings by a persistent idea, image, or desire.” The rest of the world thinks this mindset is a disease, but I think it describes the perfect approach for your success. To dominate your space, your goals, your dreams and ambitions you must first dominate your day. Obsession is not a bad thing—it is a requirement to get where you want to go.

Think of obsession like a bon-fire. You want to build it so big that people want to sit around it. Until you become obsessed with your mission no one will take you that seriously. Until the planet understands you will not give up or go away, that you are 100 percent committed, you will not get the attention you have to have to grow big. When you become obsessed with your idea, product, purpose or goal you will become equally obsessed with making it work and making it succeed bigtime.

You don’t need a business plan. You need some giant, massive targets, and you need to get the people around you in support of those targets. Get obsessed, even be a maniac, and you will do better than the average person who types up a “business plan”.

Remember, go big—because small fails in anything. You can’t predict what next month will hold much less next year. Get on my Playbook today so you can have the skills to create your own economy no matter what the economy does.

Be great,

Grant Cardone

About The Author