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The 4 Quadrants of Real Estate- Real Estate Investing Made Simple

In this Show

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You shouldn’t invest in real estate if you don’t know the market. You have to know about the location and what kind of residents are in the area. When you know what you’re doing, you’ll make money. If you’re not making money, then you don’t know something. The real estate is a game about KNOW.

The 4 Quadrants of Real Estate are:

● Price
● Down Payment
● Debt and
● Cash-on-cash

Important is Price and the most important is Cash-on-cash.

Use the 3X rule to figure out what property you kind afford. If you can put down $100,000, then you can afford a $300,000 property. If you put down $1,000,000, then you can afford a $3,000,000 property.

Debt is not a bad thing. It’s not an expense—it’s optional. Dave Ramsey will tell you not to have any debt but everyone has debts. The fact that I have to rely on oxygen is a debt load. Debt is what gives you leverage to own a property that you didn’t even pay for. Debt is your friend.

How should you approach real estate deals?

1) Look at 100 Deals to buy (2 to 3)
2) Look at Bigger Deals- the small deals are how you will get wiped out
3) Learn your 4 Quadrants (price and cash-on-cash are the most important)

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